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New spa in New Ulm

Staff photo by Clay Schuldt A new type of spa experience has floated into New Ulm, which gives users an immersive therapeutic experience. The spa is called “Calm Lake Float” and is run by Virginia Suker-Moldan (far left) out of her home. Calm Lake Float allows users to experience a floatation pod by appointment.

NEW ULM — A new type of spa experience has floated into New Ulm, which gives users an immersive therapeutic experience.

The spa is called “Calm Lake Float” and is run by Virginia Suker-Moldan out of her home. Calm Lake Float allows users to experience a floatation pod by appointment.

Float pods and float tanks are light-proof, soundproof environments with water heated to human body temperature. The water is roughly 10 inches deep and contains enough salt to allow individuals to float on the surface of the water.

This technology was first invented in 1954 as a form of sensory deprivation. Since the pod is soundproof, light proof and those inside are floating in the water at the same temperature as human skin, it gives users the feeling all senses have been shut off. In recent years the technology has caught on for its therapeutic value.

Suker-Moldan said the float pod has several benefits including relaxation, pain relief and creative influence.

With modern technology like smartphones taking up a person’s life, it is becoming more difficult to disconnect from the world. The float pod helps people to fully disconnect and relax from the outside world.

Floating is also used to heal injuries. Suker-Moldan said it’s one of the few methods of taking the pressure off all joints in the body. Olympic athletes are known to use floating pods as they help heal quicker.

Floating can also help with creative energy. Suker-Moldan said many of those who try floating come out with new ideas. The calm isolation of the pod helps stimulate creativity without outside distractions.

Suker-Moldan said she first learned of the float pod therapy three years ago.“I didn’t understand it and began researching it for a year before trying it out,” she said.

Suker-Moldan became convinced of the therapeutic value of floating, but also became interested in the economic value.

“Floating has grown fast in the big cities,” she said. In some metro areas, there are not enough float pods to meet demand.

“[Floating] has not yet big in smaller communities, but New Ulm has been progressive,” Sucker-Moldan said.

She cited the Heart of New Ulm projects and other health initiatives in the community. Also, a float pod business can be run out of the home with family assistance.

Suker-Moldan is currently running Calm Lake Float as a home occupation business on Southridge Road. She owns a single float pod and began taking clients Monday, Sept. 30.

Calm Lake Float is limited to a single pod at this time. Suker-Moldan said she did not want to overexert the business. The plan is to slowly educate the public on floating before expanding. The longterm goal is to have a storefront business, but it’s easier to manage the float business from home.

“Sound control and water temperature are important,” she said. It is easier to create the correct requirements from home and any commercial storefront would need the correct plumbing.

Suker-Moldan hopes to eventually expand Calm Lake Float to a storefront building with four float pods. She said it is best to order pods in pairs because floating is often a group experience.

Those interest in making a float appointment can do so by email: virginiasukermoldan@calmfloats.com or by phone 507-920-7992.

Suker-Moldan recommends multiple appointments to accrue greater benefits. Each appointment is recommended for 90 minutes.

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