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No deal for Cohen

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal attorney, is making a sleazy attempt to save his own skin by pandering to Democrats in Congress. They should turn him down flat.

Cohen was caught red-handed in a variety of misdeeds by federal investigators. Last year, he pleaded guilty to tax evasion, fraud, campaign finance violations — and lying to Congress.

He already has gotten one postponement in reporting to prison, for medical reasons related to surgery on his shoulder. He has been sentenced to three years behind bars.

Though Cohen is guilty of multiple crimes, special counsel Robert Mueller’s team has not linked his ex-client, Trump, to allegations of cooperating with the Russian government to influence the 2016 election. That failure was despite Cohen’s desperate attempt to throw the president under the proverbial bus.

And Cohen seems to have little evidence of other wrongdoing. His accusations against Trump do not seem to have interested prosecutors enough for them to offer him a deal.

So Cohen is turning to Democrats in Congress. His lawyers have sent some leading lawmakers of that party letters offering to help them in their political vendetta against the president.

“To date, Mr. Cohen has located several documents that we believe have significant value to the various congressional oversight and investigation committees,” the attorneys wrote.

But — and you knew this was coming — going through all his evidence against Trump “requires substantial time,” and Cohen’s lawyers say he doesn’t have enough of it. He is scheduled to report to prison May 6.

Democrats in Congress should help Cohen gain another postponement, maybe even a lighter sentence, the attorneys suggested.

No doubt Trump’s foes salivated at the prospect of information they hope Cohen possesses. But if he had anything of value, why is he just now remembering it?

No, this is just another one of Cohen’s cheap, sordid tricks in an attempt to turn the political environment to his advantage.

Congressional Democrats should respond that they welcome any information Cohen has — but won’t trade their influence with prosecutors and, perhaps, judges in exchange for it.

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