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WELS Tech UnConference a success

September 20, 2013
The Journal

NEW ULM - WELS (Wisconsin Lutheran Synod) Technology Services hosted its first WELSTech Camp "unconference" on Saturday, Sept. 15, at Martin Luther College, New Ulm.

One hundred and one WELS pastors, teachers, lay people, and MLC students came to discuss technology in the ministry.

"One hundred was kind of our 'out-there' goal," said Sallie Draper, WELS technology trainer, "so we were pretty excited to break 100."

Article Photos

Submitted photo
Participants in the first-ever WELS Technology UnConference hold breakout sessions in the classroom.

The "unconference" format forgoes the formality of presentations and schedules to let attendees drive the topics and discussions, creating an open forum to share questions and ideas.

Aaron Spike, a member of St. Paul's in New Ulm, attended the event and says he appreciates the "unconference" format.

"Self-organizing conferences allow the participants to get what they want out of the conference. When participants pick the topic and lead the discussion it tends to be extremely applicable and relevant to their needs," he said in a press release.

Topics ranged from Google apps and Chrome books for the classroom to online Bible studies to social media to web design and accessibility.

Because a growing number of WELS schools are making use of the Google tools for education, Draper says, "Anything Google was very popular. There was a session on Google apps and another one on Google Chrome, and those were definitely well attended. The smartbook session was well attended as well."

Mae Tacke, development assistant at Minnesota Valley Lutheran High School, New Ulm, attended to learn more about how technology is being used in the classroom and how she, working in development, can share that with people in the pews.

She appreciated that the conference brought together people working with technology in ministry.

"I think we can learn from each other. I don't think any one of us should consider ourselves the expert. There are always good things to learn, even learning from each other's mistakes. I think the face-to-face interaction with people doing similar things is very important for the sharing process," said Tacke in the press release.

Spike also appreciated the collaboration. "Idea sharing helps us to be more efficient. Rather than inventing new techniques to deal with every new challenge in our ministries, we can learn from the experience of our peers and build on their successes," he said.

"What I saw overall," said Spike, "is that we have a large community of talented people who earnestly desire to make the best use of technology in service to the gospel. What a great asset for our synod!"

Draper says, "Our synod is moving forward with technology. We're excited about the opportunities that are available to us. There was enthusiasm and a spirit of sharing. People are willing to share their ideas and help others get started out so we can share the good news with the tools God has given us."

 
 

 

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