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Rauner leads Dillard in Illinois governor primary

March 19, 2014
Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) — Venture capitalist Bruce Rauner led the GOP primary field Tuesday night in his bid for Illinois governor, a signal many voters had embraced a first-time campaign by the multimillionaire who flooded the airwaves with vows to run the Democratic stronghold like a business and curb the influence of government unions.

With Republicans eyeing what they say is their best shot at reclaiming the state's top job in more than a decade, early returns showed Rauner leading three longtime state lawmakers — including the current state treasurer. The winner of the GOP primary will advance to a November matchup with Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, who easily won his nomination for a second full term.

Between Quinn and predecessor Rod Blagojevich, now imprisoned for corruption, Democrats have held the governorship since 2003. But Rauner could present a serious threat, partly due to a massive campaign bank account that already includes more than $6 million of his own money.

With more than three-quarters of precincts reporting, Rauner held a small lead over state Sen. Kirk Dillard, with a substantial number of votes still outstanding in suburban Chicago, where statewide races often are decided.

For voters across Illinois, the governor's race was shaping up as a potentially transformative battle over union influence, with some voters saying they wanted to break an alliance between organized labor and Democrats, who have long controlled most statewide offices and the Legislature.

Organized labor was battling back out of concern that Rauner could seek to weaken unions in the same way GOP governors have in other states across the Midwest.

Rauner says he would model his governorship after those of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels. Both significantly rolled back union power in what they said were necessary steps to attract business and reduce costs. Running against Rauner and Dillard on the GOP ballot were state Sen. Bill Brady, who conceded Tuesday night, and state Treasurer Dan Rutherford.

"Rauner is going to be a bull in a china shop; we need a bull," said Tom Sommer, a 57-year-old real estate broker from the Chicago suburb Hinsdale. "It's not going to be more of the same."

Issues such as a public pension overhaul and high taxes "are coming to the fore and the old guard is not going to handle that," Sommer said, adding that he voted for Rauner because of his tough talk against the unions that represent public sector workers. That sentiment persists despite Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn's push to fix Illinois' finances by overhauling the heavily underwater public pension systems, which earned him the unions' ire.

Rauner has also won supporters with his call for term limits.

Union leaders, meanwhile, sought Rauner's defeat by encouraging members to pull Republican ballots and vote for Dillard, who picked up several union endorsements.

The typically left-leaning unions spent more than $6 million on the GOP primary, both in anti-Rauner and pro-Dillard ads. Rauner raised more than $14 million, including $6 million of his own money — more than any candidate seeking a gubernatorial nomination in state history.

Rauner has warned supporters about the unions' efforts, saying Quinn's "allies" were trying to hijack the election. He said legislative term limits could break the labor-Democratic alliance.

Democrats have almost total control of statewide offices and the Illinois House and Senate.

In the southern Illinois, voters had another reason to want to upend the state's political order, saying they felt marginalized and neglected by a political balance weighted toward Democrats and the Chicago region.

"In the last 10 years, things have gotten really bad (in the state)," said Marty Johns, 48, of Godfrey. "Throw out all the Democrats in Chicago. All of our money goes up there while southern Illinois gets the crumbs."

Johns said he voted for Dillard to "remove Quinn."

But others said they liked Quinn, whose administration has avoided major scandals — unlike his two predecessors who went to prison.

"I think he's honest and he does the best he can do with what he's got to work with," said Ed Kline, a 61-year-old LeRoy farmer who voted for Quinn.

Quinn, who was Blagojevich's lieutenant governor and assumed the office after he was booted amid a corruption scandal, easily defeated a lesser-known primary challenger Tio Hardiman in his bid for a second full term.

Brady won the 2010 GOP nomination, but lost the general election to Quinn. Brady, of Bloomington, said he built the support during that bid to defeat Quinn this time around.

Rutherford, of Chenoa, has done little campaigning recently. He's all but conceded defeat after a former employee filed a federal lawsuit accusing Rutherford of sexual harassment and political coercion. Rutherford denied the allegations.

Republican primary voters also chose state Sen. Jim Oberweis, a dairy magnate, to run in November against U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, the Senate's second-ranking Democrat. Oberweis, who defeated businessman and West Point graduate Doug Truax in the primary, has lost five of his six bids for public office.

Also on the ballot were primary races for the U.S. House, Illinois Legislature and statewide constitutional officers.

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Follow Sara Burnett at https://twitter.com/sara_burnett and Sophia Tareen at https://twitter.com/sophiatareen

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Associated Press writers Don Babwin in Hinsdale, Ill., Jim Suhr in Godfrey, Ill., David Mercer in LeRoy, Ill., John O'Connor in Springfield, Ill., Michael Tarm in Winnetka, Ill., contributed.

 
 

 

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