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Dr. Gamm to make case for single payer health care

January 19, 2014

NEW ULM — A New Ulm doctor will talk about the pros and cons of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and why single-payer healthcare is a good solution at 7 p.m. Sunday at the United Church of Christ (UCC....

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(19)

Reason2Puke

Jan-22-14 9:51 PM

Auntydem, in a hyperinflated system, which there is no dispute that our healthcare system is, everyone is paid more than the natural value of the product or service they provide. You don't need fraud, even though healthcare is absolutely rife with it.

More government can't fix the problem, too much government IS the problem.

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Reason2Puke

Jan-22-14 9:43 PM

The NFL is a non-profit. Roger Goodell, its commissioner, made a salary of $29.5 million last year. The elites have a well constructed sham going on by calling things names that are exactly the opposite of what they actually are.

Healthcare and the "Affordable Care Act" is the most elaborate fraud perpetrated on the American people in the history of forever. That is, until single payer is instituted.

As for the insurance companies, 7 or 8 of them have a backroom deal with the Obama administration to get a bailout on the losses they take due to the ACA, then they will get a no bid contract to administer single payer. All the while, Dr. Gamm will get her paycheck, so what does she care?

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JReader

Jan-22-14 11:08 AM

Aunty,

You know fraud is bad when you cannot even clearly identify how much of it is really going on.

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svensota

Jan-22-14 12:26 AM

Holy smokes! What happened in ER, Fischer!

Did Dr. Gamm take out your punctuation?

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Fischer

Jan-21-14 6:13 PM

It have been in ER and had Dr Gamm. Neither experience was one Where I would tell others to go see her in her in her practice. I have also heard her speak on the single payer system. not worth my time.

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mnsotn

Jan-21-14 3:49 PM

I don't know of many hospitals that are known as a charity, but even our local hospital calls itself a non-profit. For a non-profit, I often wonder why many of their services are considerably more expensive than identical services performed by Mayo health systems.

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Reason2Puke

Jan-21-14 1:43 PM

MrHistory, if Dr. Gamm was in any other business and was pushing for the federal government (U.S. taxpayers) to guarantee payments that would ultimately enrich her and her colleagues, would you be so complimentary?

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Reason2Puke

Jan-21-14 1:37 PM

Is healthcare a business or a charity? If it is a business, then having a single paying customer (ie. single payer), especially one with seemingly unlimited resources, would be a dream for recipients of that system. If it is a charity, then people like Dr. Gamm should be willing to work for free, or as close as they can come to free.

The truth is that the massive expansion of the 3rd party payer (Medicare) in 1966 was the beginning of the turnover of the U.S. medical business model to the wolves, both in the private sector insurance companies and the government. Neither can fix this problem.

If Dr. Gamm actually cared, she would work to provide services that regular people can afford, using their regular resources. That is the ONLY way healthcare will become "affordable" for everyone.

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Auntydem

Jan-21-14 11:42 AM

(continued from previous) Surely you would not consider doctors rife with fraud for that.

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Auntydem

Jan-21-14 11:39 AM

Avoice - “Rife with fraud” is a prime example of an anecdotal instant talking point. Studies published in the Journal of the American Medical Association report that the nature of the American health care system lends itself to a certain level of fraud, and the Medicare program is no more and no less susceptible to this type of crime. Three estimates of fraud in the Medicare and Medicaid programs: a low of 3%, a medium of 6% and a high of 10%. Fraud rates include things like a doctor ordering too many tests, or submitting the wrong payment codes. Media is rife with stories about doctors referring patients to diagnostic facilities they own, but they are in fact a small exception.

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Auntydem

Jan-21-14 11:13 AM

At least you got the point - I have never said profits were nasty as you have posted. They are appropriate when used wisely. As for the regulations you mention, which we both find nasty, they are the result of private insurance plans, which are a Medicare option, and Obamacare, which is simply a link to private insurance plans. That regulation you mentioned has always been the case under private plans with networks. How nice if the whole nation was our network. So many choices!

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Avoice

Jan-21-14 10:25 AM

Auntydem, that $90 aspirin is a prime example of an anecdotal instant talking point. Most times the aspirin charge is never paid for unless you are a cash paying customer which has gone by the way of the unicorns. I have never said taxes were nasty as you have posted. They are appropriate when used wisely. Single payer will create all kinds of problems of fraud much the same as Medicare and Medicaid are rife with. With complete control of the healthcare segment of the economy managed and eventual dictated coverage by government, the only savings the government will be able to claim is when they reduce what they cover and what they will pay for. Take for example the latest regulation announced - you are taken to the hospital for an emergency(which is a hospital not covered under your plan) and the hospital does not have the doctors with the specialty needed to treat you. You will be responsible for the costs of sending you to the hospital, in your plan, with the right specialty doctor.

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Auntydem

Jan-21-14 9:45 AM

Avoice, Nowhere in my posts are "nasty profits" my words. But I do draw a line at stuff like $90 for an aspirin or a hundred million bonus for an executive while a company drops a few hundred people's coverage because they got sick. I find solace that you see some value for society from taxes. I always thought you found them to be "nasty".

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Avoice

Jan-20-14 9:52 AM

Auntydem, where do you think the 2% provider tax to fund Medicaid comes from? Where do the funds for all the smoking cessation programs from? Where do you think all the funds come for all the health education come from? Yep, it is those nasty profits that make all that possible. Modernization of health care has come from the ability to provide funds to upgrade equipment, services, and facilities. From all appearances, if they left healthcare up to you, we would still be using leeches to bleed people to cure their illnesses. ask a heart transplant person or a kidney transplant person how do they feel about healthcare and you will get a different opinion of how , in your words, those "nasty profits" are used to better the health of everyone.

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JReader

Jan-20-14 9:39 AM

Will drug companies, hospitals, clinics, and doctors be negatively impacted by a single payer insurance model or will they be able to continue to charge as they currently do ? Until the delivery side of the equation is addressed it doesn't really matter what payment model we use. In fact, if Medicare is any indicator of how a single payer system would work for the general population we're all doomed unless of course you are involved with fraud industry that accompanies it.

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Auntydem

Jan-19-14 2:30 PM

R2P, that hyper-inflated system of the past 25+ years that has driven up premiums and profits while decreasing coverage and limiting choice of physicians and facilities is the problem. 25+ a few years ago put us in the 80's when The for-profit corporation became the model for free-market competition because federal grants and loans for non-profit insurers ended. Health care will never put people first when the alternative is increased profits.

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MrHistory

Jan-19-14 2:00 PM

We're lucky to have Dr. Gamm in New Ulm. It's time we recognize that the U.S. spends twice as much as other industrialized nations on health care, without delivering better results.

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Auntydem

Jan-19-14 1:47 PM

How many patients benefit from the dollars spent on websites and regulators and gatekeepers and plan administrators and all of the trappings that go along with a massive health insurance company?

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Reason2Puke

Jan-19-14 9:35 AM

How many patients benefit from the dollars spent on websites and regulators and gatekeepers and plan administrators and all of the trappings that go along with a massive government bureaucracy like single payer healthcare would be? It is pretty offensive to be told by a person who made a good living off of a hyper inflated system that she has been a part of for 25+ years, that I need to be limited to one choice, her choice, no matter how hard I work.

Here is an idea Dr. Gamm, why don't you agree to work for minimum wage and demand that the NUMC bill your patients accordingly. That would impress me. Your single payer tripe doesn't.

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